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5 Amazing 3D Printed Vehicles That Actually Move

Written by David

February 10, 2019

Divergent Blade One notable feature of the Divergent Blade 3D-printed car is that it possesses better power-to-weight ratio than other formula 1 racing cars, all thanks to its super-strong and lightweight innards. Designed by Kevin Czinger, the Divergent Blade incorporates 3D printed nodes which are connected by carbon fibre tubing into the chassis. The adoption of this system results in industrial strength frame and makes it easy to assemble the two-seater rocket in a matter of minutes. As the car uses a 3D printed aluminium alloy material for the chassis and body, the overall weight is about 630kg.

Strati Strati is a dynamic 3D-printed car created by Local Motors and is often referred to as the first 3D-printed car. Its whole body is made using FDM 3D printers but the entire car isn’t 3D-printed as the wheels and battery are made with the use of a different manufacturing technology. The major rationale behind building the car was to develop a car with reduced number of parts and also lesser cost of production. The two-seater car was manufactured in only 44 hours and is more of a neighbourhood electric car. It isn’t suitable for use on highways since it has not satisfied the stipulated safety test requirements.

4ekolka The 4ekolka is a compact 3D-printed car. The designer, Petr Chladek said that the car was designed to be an inexpensive and safe car which is usable all year round. The car is designed for a maximum of 2 people and has a maximum speed of 55km/h. It perfectly exhibits all the advantages associated with 3D-printed cars including affordability (as the prototype is about $12,000) and weight reduction.

Shelby Cobra The Shelby cobra was developed by Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL). For its printing, the Cincinnati Incorporated’s Big Area Additive Manufacturing machine (BAAM) was used. BAAM is a 3D-printer which allows the creation of strong, huge and lightweight composite parts without a requirement for tooling. The car is adequately loaded with experimental technologies and this makes it a similitude of a laboratory on wheels.

Daihatsu Copen The production of the Daihatsu Copen roadster dates as far back as 2012 and was designed by Junjie Sun and Kota Nezu. One interesting feature of this 3D-printed car is that it has some added elements for customisation because a Stratasys Fortus 450mc 3D printer was utilised to produce twelve different types of 3D effect skins in ten different colour variations. These decorative effect skins are printed in high UV stability ASA thermoplastic which allows customers to change them as well as customise them when they desire.

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